Tuesday 17th of December 2002 08:15 AM 
 
 
Victoria Crosses in the South African War

Introduction
The Victoria Cross (VC) was instituted in 1856, but was made retroactive to the autumn of 1854 to cover the period of the Crimean War.
The Cross was created to recognise very outstanding deeds of gallantry in the presence of the enemy. It was to consist of a Maltese Cross (in fact, a cross paté) of bronze made from the metal from one of the Russian guns captured at Sebastopol, with the Royal Crest in the centre and underneath a scroll bearing the words "For Valour". On the reverse side of the cross is engraved the date of the act of bravery while the name of the recipient is engraved on the back of the clasp (see below).
Clasp name example
At first the ribbon was blue for the Navy and red for the Army. But by Royal Warrant of 22 May 1920, signed by the secretary of State for War, Winston Churchill, "the ribbon is red for all services and when it only is worn, a small replica of the cross is fixed in the canted".

With the view of putting everyone on a perfectly equal footing for winning the decoration it was ordained that neither rank nor long service nor wounds nor any other circumstance, save the brave act itself, should be held to establish a sufficient claim to the honour. In the case of conspicuous bravery on the part of a body of soldiers or sailors (and later airmen), officer and other ranks had the privilege of selecting one or more of their number for the honour. In earlier wars - particularly the Indian Mutiny, a number of awards were decided in this manner. Later, the practice died out almost completely.

A Bar to the Cross could also be awarded for another act of equal bravery. There have only been three of these ever awarded.

It can only be bestowed for actions "in the presence of the enemy" (although from 1858 to 1881 an amendment allowed for awards "under circumstances of extreme danger". Six awards were made under these conditions).
The first presentation was made in Hyde Park on 26 Jun 1857 where Queen Victoria decorated 62 officers and men for actions during the Crimean War.
Each VC is still made by the same London jewelers, Messrs Hancocks [now HANCOCKS & CO. (JEWELLERS) LTD - Established 1849, 1 Burlington Gardens, London W1X 2HP, U.K. from the bronze of Chinese cannons captured from the Russians at the siege of Sebastopol. However, the VC to Lieutenant Gorle in WWI was flouroscoped by the Tower of London and found to be fairly common bronze, which was was apparently the case for some crosses in WWI.

The largest number of Victoria Crosses awarded to one regiment in a single action is seven - a Lieutenant, a corporal and five privates of the 24th Foot, who were selected for the award after the engagement at Rorkes Drift in the Zulu War of 1879. In the Gallipoli landings in 1915 the Lancashire Fusiliers won six VCs before breakfast. The youngest person to receive the award was fifteen years old and the oldest was 69 at the time.

To date, 1, 351 Victoria Crosses have been awarded; 78 from the South African War. Of these, 38 were awarded for rescuing de-horsed and wounded comrades and 16 for rescuing or recovering guns.

The Victoria Cross Cascabel
A little-known fact, even to many 'experts' is that the metal used to forge every Victoria Cross is tended by Victoria Cross Cascabel15 Regiment Royal Logistic Corps in Donnington. The VC metal rarely sees the light of day as it is secured in special vaults and is removed only under exceptional circumstances; however, on 28 May, this item of national history was transported to the Imperial War Museum in London for the royal opening of the Victoria Cross and George Cross Exhibition.
Weighing 358 ounces and looking somewhat like a lump of cheese, the VC metal is unique among BOD Donnington's 700,000 item headings of Army stores. It is all that remains of the bronze cascabels from two Russian cannon captured at Sebastopol, the last great battle of the Crimean War in 1854-55. The cascabel, a large knob at the rear of the cannon, held ropes which were used when the artillery piece was being manhandled. The two cannon, minus cascabels, stand proudly outside the Officers Mess in Woolwich.

The most recent issue of metal, exactly fifty ounces and sufficient to make twelve medals, occurred on 23 October 1959, to Messrs Hancocks & Co (Jewellers) Ltd, the royal jewellers who have been responsible for individually making each medal since the inception of the VC in 1857. Given that fifty ounces are required to make twelve Victoria Cross medals, the remaining 358 ounces contain enough for a further eighty five.
Source: Victoria Cross Reference




VICTORIA CROSSES AWARDED IN THE ANGLO-BOER WAR
LEGEND OF SYMBOLS
Denotes nationality of VC recipient.
*
Denotes those men still living in 1906.
[W]
Denotes those wounded whilst performing actions leading to the award of the VC.
[P]
Denotes those awarded the VC posthumously.
[II]
Denotes those who were awarded the VC twice.





Natal flag
ALBRECHT, Herman
[P]
Trooper Albrecht
Trooper, Imperial Light Horse (Natal), South African Forces, 1900.
Age:
approx. 24.
Deed:
On 6 January 1900 during the attack on Wagon Hill (Ladysmith), a lieutenant (JONES, R.J.T.D) of the Royal Engineers and Trooper Albrecht led the force which reoccupied the top of the hill at a critical moment, just as the three foremost attacking Boers reached it. The leader was shot by the lieutenant and the two others by Trooper Albrecht.
Killed in the above action.

 


UK flag
ATKINSON, Alfred
[P]

Sergeant, 1st Bn. The Yorkshire Regiment (Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own), British Army, 1900.
Age:
26.
Deed:
On 18 February 1900 during the Battle of Paardeberg, Sergeant Atkinson went out seven times under heavy and close fire to obtain water for the wounded. At the seventh attempt he was wounded in the head and died a few days afterwards.
Killed in the above action.


Scottish flag
BABTIE,
William*

Major, Royal Army Medical Corps, British Army, 1899.
Age:
40.
Deed:
On 15 December 1899 at the Battle of Colenso, Major Babtie rode up under heavy rifle fire to attend to the wounded who were lying in an advanced donga close to the rear of the guns. When he arrived at the donga, he attended to them all, going from place to place, exposed to the heavy rifle fire which greeted anyone who showed himself. Later in the day Major Babtie went out with another officer (CONGREVE, W. N.) to bring in a Lieutenant (ROBERTS, F. H. S.) who was lying wounded on the veldt - this also under very heavy fire.

Citation

At Colenso, on the 15th Dec 1899, the wounded of the 14th and 66th Batteries, Royal Field Artillery, were lying in an advanced donga close to the rear of the guns, without any medical officer to attend to them; and when a message was sent back asking for assistance, Major W. Babtie RAMC, rode up under a heavy rifle-fire, his pony being hit three times. When he arrived at the donga, where the wounded were lying in a sheltered corner, he attended to them all, going from place to place exposed to the heavy rifle-fire which greeted anyone who showed himself. Later on in the day Major Babtie went out with Capt Congreve to bring in Lieut. Roberts, who was lying wounded on the veldt. This also was under a heavy fire.

Click here to view Major Babtie's biography.


Irish flag
BARRY, John [P]

Private, 1st Bn. The Royal Irish Regiment, British Army, 1901.
Age:
28.
Deed:
On 7/8 January 1901 at Monument Hill, during a night attack, Private Barry, although wounded and threatened by the enemy, smashed the breach of the Maxim gun thus rendering it useless to its captors. It was while doing this gallant act that he met his death.
Killed in the above action.


UK flag
BEES, William*

Private, 1st Bn. The Derbyshire Regiment (later The Sherwood Foresters - The Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment), British Army, 1901.
Age:
29.
Deed:
On 30 September 1901 at Moedwil, Private Bees was one of a Maxim-gun detachment which suffered heavy casualties, six out of nine men being hit. Hearing his wounded comrades asking for water, Private Bees went forward under heavy fire to a spruit held by the Boers about 500 yards ahead of the men, and brought back a kettle filled with water. In doing this he had to pass within 100 yards of some rocks also held by the enemy and the kettle he was carrying was hit by several bullets.


UK flag
BEET, Harry Churchill*

Corporal, 1st Bn. The Derbyshire Regiment (later The Sherwood Foresters - The Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment), British Army, 1900.
Age:
27.
Deed:
On 22 April 1900 at Wakkerstroom, an infantry company and two squadrons of the Imperial Yeomanry had to retire from near a farm under a ridge held by the Boers. A corporal was lying on the ground wounded and Corporal Beet, seeing him, remained behind and put him under cover, bound up his wounds and, by firing, prevented the enemy from coming down to the farm until dark when a medical officer came to the wounded man's assistance. Corporal Beet was exposed to very heavy fire during the whole afternoon.



Australian flag
BELL,
Frederick William*

Lieut. BellLieutenant, West Australian Mounted Infantry, Australian Forces, 1901.
Age:
26.
Deed:
On 16 May 1901 at Brakpan, Transvaal, while his unit was retiring through a barrage of the fire, Bell turned and dashed back to pick up a dismounted fellow soldier. Bell pulled the man on to his horse but the animal fell under the additional weight when they began to go back to their own lines. Bell then dismounted, insisting that the other men take his horse, and provided covering fire until the escaping soldier was out of danger. Bell then dashed back to his colleagues under a further volley of heavy fire.



Australian flag
BISDEE, John Hutton*

Pvt. BisdeeTrooper, Tasmanian Imperial Bushmen, Australian Forces, 1900.
Age:
30.
Deed:
On 1 September 1900 at Warmbad in the Transvaal, Bisdee and other members of an eight-man reconnaissance party were ambushed by Boers in a narrow rocky pass. Six of the scouting party were hit including the two officers, Major Brooke and Lieutenant Wylly (who was also awarded a Victoria Cross for his actions that day). Major Brooke's horse had bolted in fright and Bisdee dismounted, putting the officer on his own horse and despite being seriously wounded ran alongside before pulling himself up behind the officer and withdrawing under heavy fire. Bisdee received the Victoria Cross for his bravery in this action, becoming the first Australian-born soldier serving in an Australian unit to receive the award, thus securing a prize of £52.00 per year offered by the Citizens' Life Assurance Co.


UK flag
BRADLEY, Frederick Henry*

Driver, 69th Bty. Royal Field Artillery, British Army, 1901.
Age:
25.
Deed:
On 26 September 1901 at Itala, there was a call for volunteers to carry ammunition up the hill. To do this, a space of about 150 yards swept by a heavy cross-fire, had to be crossed. A driver and a gunner came forward and started, but half way across the driver fell wounded. Driver Bradley and the gunner, without hesitation, ran out, and while the injured man was carried to cover, Driver Bradley, with another volunteer, succeeded in getting the ammunition up the hill.


Irish flag
BROWN-SYNGE-HUTCHINSON, Edward Douglas*

Major, 14th Hussars (The King's), British Army, 1900.
Age:
39.
Deed:
On 13 October 1900 at Geluk, Major Brown, seeing that the horse of one of the sergeants had been shot, helped the man up behind him and carried him for about three-quarters of a mile to a place of safety. He did this under heavy fire. Afterwards he helped a lieutenant to mount his horse which was very restive under heavy fire - the officer could not have mounted without this help. Later, Major Brown carried a wounded lance-corporal out of action to safety.


South AfricanSouth African
CLEMENTS, John James*
[W]
Corporal, Rimington's Guides, South African Forces, 1901.
Age:
29.
Deed:
On 24 February 1901 near Strijdenburg, Corporal Clements was dangerously wounded in the lungs and called upon to surrender, but instead he threw himself into the midst of a party of Boers, shooting three of them with his revolver, and thereby causing the whole party to surrender.


Canadian flag
COCKBURN, Hampden Zane Churchill.
[W]

Lieutenant, Royal Canadian Dragoons, Canadian Forces, 1900.
Age:
33.
Deed:
On 7 November 1900 during the action at Komati River (Leliefontein), Lieutenant Cockburn with a handful of men, at a most critical moment, held off the enemy to enable the guns to get away. To do so he had to sacrifice himself and his party, all of whom were killed, wounded, or taken prisoner. He himself was slightly wounded.
Notes:
Buried at St. Jame's Cemetery, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Hill A. Section S 1/2. Lot 11. Headstone.


UK flag
CONGREVE, Walter Norris*
[W]
Captain, The Rifle Brigade (Prince Consort's Own), British Army, 1899.
Age:
37.
Deed:
On 15 December 1899 at the Battle of Colenso, Captain Congreve with several others, tried to save the guns of the 14th and 66th Batteries, Royal Field Artillery, when the detachments serving the guns had all become casualties or been driven from their guns. Some of the horses and drivers were sheltering in a donga about 500 yards behind the guns and the intervening space was swept with shell and rifle fire. Captain Congreve, with two other officers (F.H.S. ROBERTS and H.N. SCHOFIELD) helped to hook a team into a limber and then to limber up a gun. Although wounded himself, seeing one of the officers fall, he went out with an RAMC Major (W. BABTIE) and brought him in.


UK flag
COULSON, Gustavus Hamilton Blenkinsopp
[P]
Lieut. CoulsonLieutenant, King's Own Scottish Borderers, British Army, 1901.

Age:
22.
Deed:
On 18 May 1901 at Lambrechtfontein, during a rearguard action in which Lieutenant Coulson rallied his men and saved the guns, a corporal who was the lieutenant's servant, had his horse shot. Lieutenant Coulson, seeing this, dismounted and took the man up on his own horse, but after a short distance the horse was wounded and both riders were brought to the ground. Lieutenant Coulson then told the corporal to get along with the wounded horse as best he could, while he, the lieutenant, would look after himself. He was, however, mortally wounded almost at once.
Notes:
Killed in the above action.


UK flag
CRANDON, Harry George

Private, 18th Hussars (Queen Mary's Own), British Army, 1901
Age:
27.
Deed:
On 4 July 1901 at Springbok Laagte, Private Crandon rode back to help another private who was wounded and whose horse became disabled. Private Crandon gave up his horse to the wounded man so that he could reach shelter, and followed on foot, having to run 1,100 yards, all the time under fire.




Irish flag
CREAN, Thomas Joseph*
[W]
Surgeon-Captain CreanSurgeon Captain, 1st lmperial Light Horse (Natal), South African Forces, 1901.
Age:
28.
Deed:
On 18 December 1901, during the action at Tygerkloof Spruit, Surgeon Captain Crean, although wounded himself, continued to attend to the wounded in the firing line, under a very heavy fire at only 150 yards range. He did not stop until hit a second time.
Brief History:
Thomas Joseph Crean was born in Dublin on 19 April 1873 and was educated at Clongowes School and at the Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin qualifying LRCP LRCSI and LM in 1896. In 1891 he received the Royal Humane Society Testimonial for saving life at sea.
In 1899 he joined the Imperial Light Horse as a Trooper, and serving in the South African War, was appointed to command a squadron in the rank of Captain in 1900. He resigned his commission the following year, being recommissioned as Surgeon Captain to the same regiment. He was wounded at Elandslaagte, and again at Tygerskloof when he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

Citation:

During the action with De Wet at Tygerskloof on the 18th Dec 1901, this officer continued to attend to the wounded in the firing line, under a heavy fire at only 150 yards' range, after he had himself been wounded, and only desisted when he was hit a second time, and, as it was first thought, mortally wounded.


UK flag
CURTIS, Albert, Edward*

Private Curtis - thumbnail onlyPrivate, 2nd Bn. The East Surrey Regiment, British Army, 1900.
Age:
34.
Deed:
On 23 February 1900 at Onderbank Spruit, a colonel lay all day in an open space under close fire from the enemy who fired on any man that moved. The colonel was wounded eight or nine times. Private Curtis after several attempts, managed to reach him, bound his wounds and gave him his own flask, all under heavy fire. He then, with the assistance of another man, tried to move the wounded officer who, fearing that both men would be killed, told them to leave him. This they refused to do, and eventually managed to carry him to safety.


Scottish flag
DIGBY-JONES, Robert James Thomas.[P]

Lieutenant, Corps of Royal Engineers, British Army, 1900.
Age:
23.
Deed:
On 6 January 1900 during the attack on Wagon Hill (Ladysmith), South Africa, Lieutenant Digby-Jones and a trooper (ALBRECHT, H.) of the Imperial Light Horse led the force which re-occupied the top of the hill at a critical moment, just as the three foremost attacking Boers reached it. The leader was shot by Lieutenant Digby-Jones and the two others by the trooper.
Notes:

Killed in this action.


UK flag
DOUGLAS, Henry Edward Manning

Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps, British Army, 1899.
Age:
24.
Deed:
On 11 December 1899, at Magersfontein, Lieutenant Douglas went out in the open and attended to wounded officers and men under intense enemy fire. He performed many similar acts of gallantry on the same day.
Brief History:
Henry Douglas was born on 11 July 1875 in Gillingham, Kent. He was educated in Edinburgh and took the Scottish conjoint examination qualifying in 1898. A year later he was commissioned into the RAMC as a Lieutenant, and in the same year saw active service in the South African War. He was Mentioned in Despatches in 1900 and again in 1901. Lt Douglas was present at many of the major actions of the war including the Advance upon Kimberley, the Operations in the Orange Free State, and in the Cape Colony, but it was at Magersfontein that he displayed the gallantry which resulted in the award of the Victoria Cross.

Citation:

On the 11th December 1899 during the action at Magersfontein Lieut Douglas showed great gallantry and devotion under a very severe fire, in advancing in the open, and attending to Capt Gordon, Gordon Highlanders, who was wounded, and also attending to Major Robinson and other wounded men under a fearful fire. Many similar acts of devotion and gallantry were performed by Lieut Douglas on the same day.


UK flag
DOXAT, Alexis Charles*

Lieutenant, 3rd Bn. Imperial Yeomanry, British Army, 1900.
Age:
33.
Deed:
On 20 October 1900 near Zeerust, Lieutenant Doxat, with a party of mounted infantry was reconnoitring a position held by 100 Beers on a ridge of kopjes. When the enemy opened a heavy fire on the reconnaissance party they had to retire, but Lieutenant Doxat, seeing that one of his men had lost his horse, galloped back under very heavy fire and took him on his own horse to a place of safety.


UK flag
DUGDALE, Frederic Brooks

Lieutenant, 5th Lancers (Royal Irish), British Army, 1901.
Age:
24.
Deed:
On 3 March 1901 near Derby, Lieutenant Dugdale was in command of a small outpost when, having been ordered to retire, his patrol came under heavy fire at a range of about 250 yards, and a sergeant, two men and a horse were hit. Lieutenant Dugdale dismounted and put one of the wounded men on his own horse. He then caught another horse, galloped up to another wounded man and took him up behind him, then brought both men safely out of action. He died on 13 November 1902 at Blakemore Cove, Gloucestershire, when his horse fell at a fence while hunting with the North Cotswold Hounds, crushing him so severely that he never regained conciousness and died within two hours.


UK flag
DURRANT, Alfred, Edward*

Private, 2nd Bn. The Rifle Brigade (Prince Consort's Own), British Army, 1900.
Age:
36.
Deed:
On 27 August 1900 at Bergendal, a corporal having been wounded and somewhat dazed, got up from his prone position in the firing line and started to run towards the enemy. Private Durrant rose and, pulling him down, tried to keep him quiet, but finding this impossible, he took him up and carried him back for 200 yards under heavy fire to shelter. The private then returned immediately to his place in the line.


UK flag
ENGLEHEART, Henry, William*

Sergeant, 10th Hussars (Prince of Wales' Own Royal), British Army, 1900.
Age:
36.
Deed:
On 13 March 1900, north of Bloemfontein, the party which had destroyed the railway had to get over four deep spruits in order to make their way back through enemy lines. At the fourth spruit the horse of one of the sappers failed to get up the bank and he was left in a very dangerous position. In the face of very heavy fire Sergeant Engleheart went to the rescue of the sapper and his horse. Shortly before this he had shown great gallantry in dashing into the first spruit and dealing with the Boers there, before they had time to rally.


Irish flag
ENGLISH, William, John*

Lieut. EnglishLieutenant, 2nd Scottish Horse, South African Forces, 1901.
Age:
18.
Deed:
On 3 July 1901 at Vlakfontein, Lieutenant English was holding a position under attack by the enemy. Two of his men were killed and two wounded, but the position was still held, largely owing to the lieutenant's personal pluck. When the ammunition ran short, he went over to the next party to get more, over 15 yards of open ground, under very heavy fire at a range of 20 to 30 yards.

 


Scottish flag
FARMER, Donald, Dickson*

Sergeant Farmer - thumbnail onlySergeant, 1st Bn. The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, British Army, 1900.
Age:
23.
Deed:
On 13 December 1900 during an attack at Nooitgedacht, a lieutenant with 15 men went to the assistance of a piquet which was heavily engaged, most of the men having been killed or wounded. The enemy immediately opened fire on the relief party, killing two and wounding five, including the lieutenant. Sergeant Farmer at once went to the officer who was quite helpless, and carried him away under heavy fire to a place of comparative safety, after which he returned to the firing line and was eventually taken prisoner.


UK flag
FIRTH, James*
[W]
Sergeant, 1st Bn. The Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment, British Army, 1900.
Age:
34.
Deed:
On 24 February 1900 at Plewman's Farm, near Arundel, Cape Colony, Sergeant Firth picked up and carried to cover a lance-corporal who was lying wounded and exposed to heavy fire. Later in the day, when the enemy had advanced to within a short distance of the firing line, Sergeant Firth rescued a second lieutenant who was dangerously wounded, and carried him over the crest of a ridge to safety. He himself was shot through the nose and eye while doing so.


Irish flag
FITZ-CLARENCE, Charles.* [W]

Captain, Royal Fusiliers att. Protectorate Regiment, British Army, 1899.
Age:
34.
Deed:
On 14 October 1899 near Mafeking, Captain FitzClarence went with a partially-trained squadron to the assistance of an armoured train. The enemy was in greatly superior numbers and the squadron was, for a time, surrounded and in great danger. The captain, however, so inspired his men that not only was the train relieved, but a heavy defeat was inflicted on the Boers. On 27 October he led his squadron in a successful night attack and on 26 December he again distinguished himself, and was severely wounded.


UK flag
GLASOCK, Horace Henry.* [W]

Driver, 'Q Bty' Royal Horse Artillery, British Army, 1900.
Age:
19.
Deed:
On 31 March 1900 at Korn Spruit, two batteries of the Royal Horse Artillery were ambushed with the loss of most of the baggage column and five guns of the leading battery. When the alarm was given 'Q' Battery went into action 1150 yards from the spruit, until the order to retire was received, when the major (HORNBY, E.J. PHIPPS) commanding the battery ordered the guns and their limbers to be run back by hand to a safe place. This most exhausting operation was carried out by among others, Driver Glasock, a sergeant (PARKER, C.E.H.) and a gunner (LODGE, I.) and when at last all but one of the guns and one limber had been moved to safety, the battery was reformed.


Scottish flag
GORDON, William Eagleson
*
Captain, Gordon Highlanders, British Army, 1900.
Age:
34.
Deed:
On 11 July 1900 near Krugersdorp, a party of men had succeeded in dragging an artillery waggon under cover when its horses were unable to do so, because of heavy and accurate firing by the enemy. Captain Gordon then went out alone to the nearest gun under heavy fire and then having fastened a drag rope to the gun, he called for volunteers to come and help. While the gun was being moved, however, a captain (YOUNGER, D.R.) and three men were hit, and to save further casualties, Captain Gordon ordered the remainder of the party to take cover, and having seen the wounded safely away, he himself retired.



UK flag
HAMPTON, Harry
.*
Sergeant, The King's (Liverpool) Regiment, British Army, 1900.
Age:
29.
Deed:
On 21 August 1900 at Van Wyk's Vlei, Sergeant Hampton, who was in command of a small party of mounted infantry, held an important position for some time against heavy odds, and when compelled to retire saw all his men into safety and then, although he himself had been wounded in the head, supported a lance-corporal who was unable to walk until the latter was hit again and apparently killed. Sergeant Hampton received another wound some time later.



New Zealand flag
HARDHAM, William James*

Farrier-Major, 4th New Zealand Contingent, New Zealand Forces, 1901.
Age:
24.
Deed:
On 28 January 1901 near Naauwpoort, Farrier-Major Hardham was with a section which was hotly engaged with a party of about 20 Boers. Just before the force started to retire, a trooper was wounded and his horse killed. The Farrier-Major at once went, under heavy fire, to his assistance, dismounted and put him on his own horse, and then ran alongside until he had guided the wounded man to a place of safety.
First New Zealand-born man to win the Victoria Cross.



UK flag
HEATON, William Edward
.*
Private, The King's Regiment, British Army, 1900.
Age:
Approx. 25.
Deed:
On 23 August 1900 at Geluk, a company of the 1st Bn. The King's (Liverpool) Regiment became surrounded by the enemy and was suffering severely. Private Heaton volunteered to take a message back to explain the position of the company and he carried out this mission successfully at imminent risk to his own life. Had it not been for his courage, the remainder of his company would almost certainly have had to surrender.


Canadian flag
HOLLAND, Edward James Gibson.*

Sergeant HollandSergeant, Royal Canadian Dragoons, Canadian Forces, 1900.
Age:
22.
Deed:
On 7 November 1900, Sergeant Holland kept the Boers away from two 12-pounder guns with his Colt gun. When he saw that the enemy were too near for him to escape with the carriage, as the horse was blown, he calmly lifted the gun off and galloped away with it under his arm.


Go here to view a very good page, authored by Sergeant Holland's Great Great Grandson.



UK flag
HOUSE, Private William*[W]

Private, Royal Berkshire Regiment (Prince Charlotte of Wales'), British Army, 1900.
Age:
21.
Deed:
During the attack on Mosilikatse Nek, on the 2nd of August 1900, when a Sergeant who had gone forward to reconnoitre, was wounded, Private House rushed out from cover (though cautioned not to do so as the fire from the enemy was very hot), picked up the wounded Sgt., and endeavoured to bring him into shelter, in doing which Private House was himself severely wounded. He, however, warned his comrades not to come to his assistance, the fire being so severe.
Mosilikatse Nek is near Rustenberg in the Megalesburg Mountains, 15 miles West of Pretoria.
He had the year before been awarded the D.C.M. for his action but it was upgraded to the Victoria Cross.
Before Private House got his V.C. there was a debate at the highest levels about giving this medal to soldiers who put themselves on offer for wounded comrades, bur Sir Ian Hamilton stated:

'I have usually objected to VCs being awarded for rescuing wounded men in civilised war when (if they lay quite still) they were probably safer than being rescued. But the particular coolness of this man as evinced by his warning the others not to follow his example is very commendable and I would gladly see him get the decoration.'

He was under the immediate command of Captain Sir Edward Pasley, Bart., Sir Ian Hamilton commanding the Division. At the time of his action he was serving in the 2nd Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment, Princess Charlotte of Wales'. He later left the army but rejoined being posted to the 2nd Battalion Royal Berks where he was later promoted to Lance Corporal and served in India he later rejoined the 1st Battalion and was posted to Shaft Barracks Dover. He enlisted on 3rd November 1896.
He committed suicide in 1912 while still serving in the 1st Battalion at Shaft Barracks Dover. He is buried in Dover. A headstone was not erected probably because suicide was frowned on at the original time of his death.
It is now thought he may have committed suicide due to the injuries he received during his act of bravery. He was wounded twice in the head during the act.
He was presented with his VC at Buckingham Palace on the 24th October 1902 by King Edward VII. He also received the Queen's and King's medals for the South African Campaign, with 3 bars to the former and 2 bars for the latter. The Queens medal was awarded for service in the Boer War between 1899-1902. Clasps for Cape Colony, Orange Free State & Transvaal. Clasps were awarded for 24 different engagements.
The Kings medal was awarded in 1902 to soldiers who had completed 18 months service in South Africa with clasps for 1901 & 1902.
He was promoted to Lance Corporal on 3rd Dec. 1906, 'C' company. His medals are now in the Regimental Museum in Salisbury.
At the time of his suicide 2 other VC holders were serving at the same barracks. Major J. E. I. Masterson of the Kings Own and Sergeant W. B. Traynor of the West Yorkshire Regt. (Barrack Warden).
He was born 7th October 1879 Thatcham, Berkshire, England.
[This information was kindly provided by Mr. Bob Plumridge]



Australian flag
HOWSE, Neville, Reginald*

Cpt. HowseCaptain (Maj.) New South Wales Medical Staff Corps, Australian Forces, 1900.
Age:
36.
Deed:
On 24 July 1900 during the action at Vredefort, Captain Howse saw a trumpeter fall and went through very heavy cross-fire to rescue the man. His horse was soon shot from under him and the captain continued on foot, reached the casualty and dressed his wound. He then carried him to safety.

 


UK flag
IND, Alfred, Ernest.*

Shoeing-Smith, Royal Horse Artillery, British Army, 1901.
Age:

29.
Deed:
On 20 December 1901 near Tafelkop, Orange River Colony, Shoeing-Smith Ind stuck to his pom-pom gun under very heavy fire when the whole of the remainder of the team had been shot down, and continued to fire into the advancing enemy until the last possible moment. A captain who was mortally wounded on this occasion, requested that Shoeing-Smith Ind's gallant conduct on this and in every other action since he joined the pom-pom service be brought to notice.



UK flag
INKSON, Edgar, Thomas.*

Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps, British Army, 1900.
Age:
27.
Deed:
On 24 February 1900, at Hart's Hill, Colenso, Lieutenant Inkson carried a young officer, who was severely wounded and unable to walk, for three or four hundred yards, under very heavy fire, to a place of safety.




Irish flag
JOHNSTONE, Robert.*

Captain Johnstone Captain, Imperial Light Horse (Natal), South African Forces, 1899.
Age:
27.
Deed:
On 21 October 1899 at the Battle of Elandslaagte, at a most critical moment, when the advance was momentarily checked by very severe fire at point-blank range, Captain Johnston and another officer (MULLINS, C.H.) gallantly rushed forward under very heavy fire and rallied the men thus enabling the decisive flanking movement to be carried out.

 


Scottish flag
KENNEDY, Charles, Thomas.[W] *

Private, Highland Light Infantry, British Army, 1900.
Age:
24.
Deed:
On 22 November 1900 at Dewetsdorp, Private Kennedy carried a wounded comrade who was bleeding to death, from Gibraltar Hill to the hospital, a distance of three-quarters of a mile, under very heavy fire. On the following day, he volunteered to carry a message to the commandant across a space over which it was almost certain death to venture. He did not, however, succeed in delivering the message, as he was severely wounded before he had gone 20 yards.



UK flag
KIRBY, Frank, Howard.*

Corporal, Royal Engineers, British Army, 1900.
Age:
28.
Deed:
On 2 June 1900 near Delagoa Bay Railway, during the retirement of a small party being hotly pressed by superior numbers of the enemy, Corporal Kirby turned and rode back to help a man whose horse had been shot. Although by the time he reached the man they were under heavy fire at close range, Corporal Kirby managed to get the man up behind him and took him clear of the firing. This was the third occasion on which Corporal Kirby had shown gallantry in the face of the enemy.



UK flag
KNIGHT, Henry, James.*

Corporal KnightCorporal, The King's (Liverpool) Regiment, British Army, 1900.
Age:
21.
Deed:
On 21 August 1900 during the operations near Van Wyk's Vlei, Corporal Knight and four men were covering the right rear of a detachment of their company when they were attacked by the enemy. The corporal held his ground, directing his men to retire one by one to better cover, where he maintained his position for nearly an hour, covering the withdrawal of part of their company, and losing two of his four men. He then retired, taking with him two wounded men, one of whom he left in a place of safety and the other he carried himself for nearly two miles.



UK flag
LAWRENCE, Brian Turner Tom.

Sergeant, 17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own), British Army, 1900.
Age:
26.
Deed:
On 7 August 1900 near Essenbosch Farm, Sergeant Lawrence and a private were attacked by a group of Boers. The private's horse was shot and the man thrown, dislocating his shoulder. Sergeant Lawrence at once went to his assistance, put him on his own horse and sent him on to the picket. He then took the soldier's carbine, and with his own as well, kept the enemy off until the wounded man was safely out of range. The sergeant then retired for some two miles on foot, followed by the Boers, keeping them off until help arrived.



UK flag
LODGE, Isaac.*

Gunner, 'Q Bty' Royal Horse Artillery, British Army, 1900.
Age:
33.
Deed:
On 31 March 1900 at Korn Spruit, two batteries of the Royal Horse Artillery were ambushed with the loss of most of the baggage column and five guns of the leading battery. When the alarm was given, 'Q' Battery went into action 1150 yards from the spruit, until the order to retire was received, when the major (HORNBY, EJ.P-.) commanding the battery ordered the guns and their limbers to be run back by hand to a safe place. This most exhausting operation was carried out by, among others, Gunner Lodge, a sergeant (PARKER, C.E.H.) and a driver (GLASOCK, H.H.) and when at last all but one of the guns and one limber had been moved to safety, the battery was reformed.



Scottish flag
MACKAY, John Frederick.*

Corporal, '1st Btn' Gordon Highlanders, British Army, 1900.
Age:
26.
Deed:
On 20 May 1900 during the action on Crow's Nest Hill, Johannesburg, Corporal Mackay repeatedly rushed forward under withering fire at short range to attend to wounded comrades and dress their wounds. He was himself without shelter and on one occasion he carried a wounded man from the open, under fire, to the shelter of a boulder.



UK flag
MANSEL-JONES, Conwyn.[W]*

Captain, West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales' Own), British Army, 1900
.
Age:
28.
Deed:
On 27 February 1900 north of Tugela, Natal, the companies of The West Yorkshire Regiment met with severe shell and rifle fire on the northern slope of Terrace Hill and their advance was temporarily checked. Captain Mansel-Jones, however, by his strong initiative and example restored confidence and in spite of his falling very seriously wounded, the men took the whole ridge without further check.


Cape Colony
MARTINEAU, Horace Robert
[W]*
Sergeant, Protectorate Regiment (North-West Cape Colony), 1899
.
Age:
25.
Deed:
On 26 December 1899 near Mafeking, South Africa, during the action at Game Tree, when the order to retire had been given, Sergeant Martineau rescued a corporal who had been struck down near the Boer trenches The sergeant managed to half-drag, half-carry the wounded man to a bush where he attended to his wounds. He was shot in the side himself, but took no notice and carried on helping the corporal until he was wounded a second time and was forced to give up.
Notes:
Grave/Memorial Buried at Andersons Bay Soldiers Cemetery, Dunedin, New Zealand. Returned Serviceman's Area. Block 73. Lot 16. Headstone (hia name is also on the family grave at Brookwood Cemetery, Surrey, England).



UK flag
MARTIN-LEAKE, Arthur.[W]* [II]
Surgeon-Captain Martin-LeakeSouth African Constabulary then, Royal Army Medical Corps, British Army
attd. 5th Field Ambulance, 1902.

Age:
27.
Deed:
On 8 February 1902, at Vlakfontein, South Africa, Surgeon Captain Martin-Leake went out into the firing line to dress a wounded man under very heavy enemy fire only 100 yards off. He then attended a badly wounded officer and while doing so was shot himself. He only gave up when thoroughly exhausted and then refused water until other wounded men had been served.

Click here for more information on this man.



Irish flag
MASTERSON, James Edward Ignatius[W]
*
Lieut. MastersonLieutenant, Devonshire Regiment, British Army, 1900.
Age:
37.
Deed:
On 6 January 1900 at Wagon Hill, Ladysmith, South Africa, Lieutenant Masterson was commanding one of the three companies of his regiment which captured a position held by the enemy. The companies were then exposed to very heavy fire from the right and left front, so the lieutenant undertook to get a message to the Imperial Light Horse, to fire to the left front in order to check the enemy's fire. To do this he had to cross an open space of 100 yards swept by heavy cross-fire, but although wounded in both thighs, he managed to deliver his message before falling, exhausted.

UK flag
MAXWELL, Francis Aylmer*

Indian Staff Corps att Robert's Horse, Indian Army, 1900.
Age:
28.
Deed:
On 31 March 1900 at Korn Spruit, South Africa, Lieutenant Maxwell carried out the self-imposed duty of saving the guns. He went out on five different occasions and helped to bring in two guns and three limbers, one of which he, another officer and some gunners dragged in by hand. He also went out with two other officers and tried to get the last gun in and remained there until the attempt had to be abandoned. During a previous campaign, (the Chitral Expedition, 1895) he had removed the body of a lieutenant colonel of the Corps of Guides, under fire.



Australian flag
MAYGAR, Leslie Cecil.*

Lieut. MaygarLieutenant, Victorian Mounted Rifles, Australian Forces, 1901.
Age:
29.
Deed:
On 23 November 1901 at Geelhoutboom, Natal, South Africa, Lieutenant Maygar galloped out and ordered men of a detached post, which was being outflanked, to retire. The horse of one of the men was shot under him when the enemy were within 200 yards and Lieutenant Maygar dismounted and lifted the man on to his own horse which bolted into boggy ground, making them both dismount. As the horse could not carry two, the lieutenant again put the man on its back and told him to gallop for cover at once, while he himself went on foot. All this took place under very heavy fire.


UK flag
MEIKLEJOHN, Matthew Fontaine Maury.[W]

Captain, Gordon Highlanders, British Army, 1899.
Age:
28.
Deed:
On 21 October 1899 at the Battle of Elandslaagte, South Africa, after the main Boer position had been captured, some men of the Gordon Highlanders who were about to assault a kopje were exposed to heavy crossfire, and having lost their leaders started to waver. Seeing this, Captain Meiklejohn rushed to the front and called on the Gordons to follow him. By his conspicuous bravery and example he rallied the men and led them against the enemy's position, where he fell, desperately wounded in four places.



UK flag
MILBANKE, Sir John Peniston
.[W]*
Lieutenant, 10th Hussars, British Army, 1900.

Age:
27.
Deed:
On 5 January 1900 near Colesberg, South Africa, during a reconnaissance, Lieutenant Milbanke, when retiring under fire, with a small patrol, rode back to help one of his men whose horse was exhausted. Notwithstanding the fact that he was severely wounded in the thigh, the lieutenant took the man up on his own horse under very heavy fire and got him safely back to camp.



Natal
MULLINS, Charles Herbert[W]*

Captain MullinsCaptain, Imperial Light Horse (Natal), South African Forces, 1899.
Age:
30.
Deed:
On 21 October 1899 at the Battle of Elandslaagte, South Africa, at a most critical moment, when the advance was momentarily checked by very severe fire at point-blank range, Captain Mullins and another officer (JOHNSTON, R.) gallantly rushed forward under very heavy fire and rallied the men, thus enabling the decisive flanking movement to be carried out. Captain Mullins was wounded during the action.

 



Canadian flag
NICKERSON, William Henry Snyder*

Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps, British Army, 1900.
Age:
25.
Deed:
On 20 April 1900 at Wakkerstroom, South Africa, during the advance of the infantry to support the mounted troops, Lieutenant Nickerson went under very heavy shell, and rifle fire to attend a wounded man. He dressed his wounds and remained with him until he could be taken to a place of safety.
Notes:
Buried in a private burial ground at his home in Cour, Kintyre, Scotland.



UK flag
NORWOOD,
John.*
Second Lieutenant, 5th Dragoon Guards (Princess Charlotte of Wales'), British Army, 1899.
Age:
23.
Deed:
On 30 October 1899 at Ladysmith, South Africa, Second Lieutenant Norwood went out in charge of a small patrol. They came under such heavy fire from the enemy, that when they had got to about 600 yards from them the patrol had to retire at full speed. One man dropped and Second Lieutenant Norwood galloped back through heavy fire, dismounted and, picking up the fallen trooper, carried him on his back, at the same time leading his horse with one hand. The enemy kept up an incessant fire during the whole of this time.



Irish flag
NURSE, George Edward.*

Corporal, '66th Bty' Royal Field Artillery, British Army, 1899.
Age:
26.
Deed:
On 15 December 1899, at the Battle of Colenso, South Africa, Corporal Nurse, with several others, tried to save the guns of the 14th and 66th Batteries, Royal Field Artillery, when the detachments serving the guns had all become casualties or been driven from their guns. Some of the horses and drivers were sheltering in a donga about 500 yards behind the guns and the intervening space was swept with shell, and rifle fire. Corporal Nurse, with three officers (CONGREVE, W.N., ROBERTS, F.H.S. and SCHOFIELD, H.N.) helped to hook a team into a limber and then to line up a gun. Then, on his own, he managed to limber up a second gun.



UK flag
PARKER, Charles Edward Haydon.*

Sergeant, 'Q Battery', Royal Horse Artillery, British Army, 1900.
Age:
30.
Deed:
On 31 March 1900 at Korn Spruit, South Africa, two batteries of the Royal Horse Artillery were ambushed with the loss of most of the baggage column and five guns of the leading battery. When the alarm was given, 'Q' Battery went into action 1150 yards from the spruit, until the order to retire was received, when the major (HORNBY, E J. Phipps-) commanding the battery ordered the guns and their limbers to be run back by hand to a safe place. This most exhausting operation was carried out by, among others, Sergeant Parker, a gunner and a driver (LODGE, I. and GLASOCK, H.H.) and when at last all but one of the guns and one limber had been moved to safety, the battery was reformed.
Notes:
This VC was awarded by ballot.



UK flag
PARSONS, Francis Newton.

Lieutenant, '1 Bn' Essex Regiment, British Army, 1900.
Age:
24.
Deed:
On 18 February 1900 at the Battle of Paardeberg, South Africa, a private of The Essex Regiment was wounded and while trying to take cover was wounded again. Lieutenant Parsons went to his assistance, dressed his wounds under heavy fire, fetched water from the river nearby, still under heavy fire, and then carried him to a place of safety.
Notes:
Killed in action, Driefontein, South Africa - 10th March 1900.



UK flag
PHIPPS-HORNBY, Edmund John.*

Major, 'Q Bty' Royal Horse Artillery, British Army, 1900.
Age:
42.
Deed:
On 31 March 1900 at Korn Spruit, South Africa, two batteries of the Royal Horse Artillery were ambushed with the loss of most of the baggage column and five guns of the leading battery. When the alarm was given 'Q' Battery, commanded by Major Phipps-Hornby, went into action 1150 yards from the spruit, until the order to retire was received, when the major commanded that the guns and their limbers be run back by hand to a safe place - a most exhausting operation over a considerable distance, but at last all but one of the guns and one limber had been moved to safety and the battery reformed.
Notes:
Buried St. Andrew's Churchyard, Sonning, Berkshire, England.



UK flag
Pitts, James.

Private, 1st Btn, Manchester Regiment, British Army, 1900.
Age:
22.
Deed:
On 6 January 1900 during an attack on Caesar's Camp, Natal, South Africa, 16 men of 'D' Company were defending one of the slopes of the hill. The defenders were under heavy fire all day, the majority being killed and their positions occupied by the enemy. At last only Private Pitts and one other man (SCOTT, R.) remained. They held their post for 15 hours without food or water, all the time exchanging deadly fire with the enemy, until relief troops had retaken the lost ground and pushed the enemy off the hill.



UK flag
PRICE-DAVIES, Llewellyn Alberic Emilius.[W]*

Lieutenant, King's Royal Rifle Corps, British Army, 190
1.
Age:
23.
Deed:
On 17 September 1901 at Blood River Poort, South Africa the Boers had overwhelmed the right of the British column and some 400 of them were galloping round the flank and rear of the guns calling on the drivers to surrender them. Lieutenant Price-Davies, hearing an order to fire on the charging Boers, at once drew his revolver and dashed upon them in a desperate attempt to rescue the guns. He was immediately shot and knocked off his horse, but was not mortally wounded although he had ridden to what seemed certain death.
Notes:
Buried St. Andrew's Churchyard, Sonning, Berkshire, England.



Cape Colony
RAMSDEN, Horace Edward.*

Trooper, Protectorate Regiment (North-West Cape Colony), 1899.
Age:
21.
Deed:
On 26 December 1899 near Mafeking, South Africa, during the action at Game Tree, after the order to retire had been given, Trooper Ramsden picked up his brother who had been shot through both legs and was lying some 10 yards from the Boer trenches. He carried him about 600 to 800 yards under heavy fire (putting him down from time to time to rest) until help arrived and the injured man was carried to a place of safety.



UK flag
RAVENHILL, George.*
Private RavenhillPrivate, 2nd Btn, Royal Scots Fusiliers, British Army, 1899.
Age:
27.
Deed:
On 15 December 1899 at Colenso, South Africa, Private Ravenhill went several times under heavy fire from his sheltered position as one of the escort to the guns, to assist the officers and drivers who were trying to withdraw a number of guns when the detachments serving them had all been killed, wounded or driven from them by infantry fire at close range. Private Ravenhill also helped to limber up one of the guns which was saved.

Notes:
Private Ravenhill's VC was eventually forfeited for theft of iron in 1908.



Irish flag
REED, Hamilton Lyster.[W]*

Captain, '7th Bty' Royal Field Artillery, British Army, 18
99.
Age:
30.
Deed:
On 15 December 1899 at the Battle of Colenso, South Africa, when so many horses had become casualties, Captain Reed brought three teams from his battery in an attempt to save the remaining guns. The shell and rifle fire was intense and he was wounded almost at once, as were five of the 13 men who rode with him. One was killed and 13 horses (including his own) out of 21 were killed before he got half way to the guns, and he was forced to retire.



Canadian flag
RICHARDSON, Arthur Herbert Lindsay.*

Sgt RichardsonSergeant, Strathcona's Horse, Canadian Forces, 1900.
Age:
27.
Deed:
On 5 July 1900 at Wolwespruit, Standerton, South Africa, a party of Lord Strathcona's Horse (38 in number) came into contact and was engaged at close quarters with a force of 80 of the enemy. When the order was given to retire Sergeant Richardson rode back under very heavy cross-fire, picked up a trooper whose horse had been shot and who was badly wounded and rode with him out of fire. This act of gallantry was performed within 300 yards of the enemy and Sergeant Richardson was himself riding a wounded horse.

Notes:
First man to win the VC while serving with a Canadian unit under British Command.



Irish flag
ROBERTS, Hon. Frederick Hugh Sherston.[W]

Lieut Freddy RobertsLieutenant, King's Royal Rifle Corps, British Army, 1899
Age:
27.
Deed:
On 15 December 1899 at the Battle of Colenso, South Africa, Lieutenant Roberts, with several others, tried to save the guns of the 14th and 66th Batteries, Royal Field Artillery, when the detachments serving the guns had all become casualties or been driven from their guns. Some of the horses and drivers were sheltering in a donga about 500 yards behind the guns and the intervening space was swept with shell and rifle fire. Lieutenant Roberts with two other officers (CONGREVE, W.N. and SCHOFIELD, H.N.) helped to hook a team into a limber and then to limber up a gun. While doing so, he fell badly wounded and later died of his wounds.
Notes:
Lieutenant Roberts died of wounds so VC was not awarded posthumously;
Son of Field Marshall Earl Roberts VC.


Scottish flag
ROBERTSON, William.[W]
*
Sergeant-Major, 2nd Btn, Gordon Highlanders, British Army, 1899.
Age:
34.
Deed:
On 21 October 1899 at the Battle of Elandslaagte, South Africa, during the final advance on the enemy's position, Sergeant-Major Robertson led each successive rush, exposing himself fearlessly to the enemy's artillery and rifle fire to encourage the men. After the main position had been captured, he led a small party to seize the Boer camp. Though exposed to a deadly cross-fire from the enemy's rifles, he gallantly held on to the position captured, and continued to encourage the men until he was dangerously wounded.



Australian flag
ROGERS, James.*

Sgt RogersSergeant, South African Constabulary, South African Forces, 1901.
Age:
26.
Deed:
On 15 June 1901 at Thaba 'Nchu, South Africa, during a skirmish, a party of the rearguard, consisting of a lieutenant, Sergeant Rogers and six men, was attacked by about 60 Boers. When the lieutenant's horse was shot, Sergeant Rogers rode back, took the lieutenant up behind and carried him for half a mile on his own horse. The sergeant then returned to within 400 yards of the enemy and rescued two other men who had lost their horses. Afterwards, he caught two horses and helped their owners to remount. This was done under heavy fire.


UK flag
SCHOFIELD, Harry Norton.*

Captain, Royal Field Artillery, British Army, 1899.
Age:
34.
Deed:
On 15 December 1899, at the Battle of Colenso, South Africa, Captain Schofield with several others tried to save the guns of the 14th and 66th Batteries, Royal Field Artillery, when the detachments serving the guns had all become casualties or been driven from their guns by infantry fire at close range. Captain Schofield went out with two other officers (CONGREVE, W.N. and ROBERTS, F.H.S.) and a corporal (NURSE, G.E.) when the first attempt was made to extricate the guns and helped in withdrawing the two that were saved.


Irish flag
SCOTT, Robert. [W]
*
Private, '1st Btn' Manchester Regiment, British Army, 1900.
Age:
25.
Deed:
On 6 January 1900 during an attack on Caesar's Camp, Natal, South Africa, 16 men of "D" Company were defending one of the slopes of the hill. The defenders were under heavy fire all day, the majority being killed and their positions occupied by the enemy. At last only Private Scott and one other man (PITTS, J.) remained. They held their post for 15 hours without food or water, all the time exchanging deadly fire with the enemy, until relief troops had retaken the lost ground and pushed the enemy off the hill.



UK flag
SHAUL, John David Francis.*

Corporal Shaul - thumbnail onlyCorporal, '1st Btn' Highland Light Infantry, British Army, 1899.
Age:
26.
Deed:
On 11 December 1899 during the battle of Magersfontein, South Africa, Corporal Shaul was in charge of stretcher-bearers, but at one period of the battle he was seen encouraging men to advance across the open. He was most conspicuous during the day in dressing men's wounds and in one case he came, under fire, to a man who was lying wounded in the back, and with the utmost coolness sat down beside him and proceeded to dress his wounds. This act of gallantry was performed under continuous fire as calmly as if there had been no enemy near.


UK flag
TOWSE, Ernest Beachcroft Beckwith.[W]

Captain, 1st Btn, Gordon Highlanders, British Army, 1899, 1900.
Age:
35.
Deed:
On 11 December 1899 at Magersfontein, South Africa, during a retirement, Captain Towse helped a mortally wounded colonel and although close to the front of the firing line, supported him until help arrived. On 30 April 1900 Captain Towse and 12 men confronted a party of about 150 Boers on the top of Mount Thaba, far from any support. The greatly outnumbered group were called on to surrender, but the captain ordered his men to open fire and remained firing himself until he was severely wounded (both eyes shattered) and they succeeded in driving off the enemy.
Note:
Two actions cited: Magersfontein 11 Dec 1899 and Thaba Mountain 30 Apr 1900.


Irish flag
TRAYNOR, William Bernard.[W]*

Sergeant, 2nd Btn, West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales' Own), British Army, 1901.
Age:
30.
Deed:
On 6 February 1901 at Bothwell Camp, South Africa, during a night attack, Sergeant Traynor ran out of a trench, under extremely heavy fire, to help a wounded man. While running he was wounded, and being unable to carry the man himself called for assistance. A lance-corporal came to him and between them they carried the wounded soldier into shelter. Afterwards, in spite of his wounds, Sergeant Traynor remained in command of his section, encouraging his men until the attack failed.


Canadian flag
TURNER, (later Sir) Richard Ernest William.[W]*

Lieutenant, Royal Canadian Dragoons, Canadian Forces, 1900.
Age:
29.
Deed:
On 7 November 1900 during the action at Komati River, South Africa, when the guns were in danger of being captured, Lieutenant Turner, although he had already been twice wounded, dismounted and deployed his men at close quarters and drove off the enemy, thus saving the guns.


UK flag
WARD, Charles.*[W]

Private Charles WardPrivate, Yorkshire Light Infantry, British Army, 1900.

Age:
22.
Deed:

On 26 June 1900 at Lindley, a picquet of the regiment was surrounded on three sides by about 500 Boers and the majority of them were either killed or wounded. Private Ward volunteered to take a message asking for reinforcements to the signalling post about 150 yards away. He was eventually allowed to go, although it seemed certain that he would be shot, and he managed to get across through a storm of bullets. Having delivered his message, he returned to his commanding officer across the fire-swept ground, and was severely wounded, but his gallant action saved the post from capture.



Australian flag
WYLLY, Guy George Egerton.[W]*

Lieut. WyllyLieutenant, Tasmanian Imperial Bushmen, Australian Forces, 1900.
Age:
20.
Deed:

On 1 September 1900 near Warm Baths, Transvaal, South Africa, Lieutenant Wylly was one of the advance scouting party passing through a narrow gorge, when the enemy suddenly opened fire at close range and six out of the party of eight were wounded, including Lieutenant Wylly, who, seeing that one of his men was badly wounded in the leg and that his horse was shot, went back to him. He made the wounded man take his horse while he, the lieutenant, opened fire from behind a rock to cover the retreat of the others, at the imminent risk of being cut off himself.


Irish flag
YOUNG, Alexander.*

Sergeant-Major, Cape Police, South African Forces, 1901.
Age:
28.
Deed:
On 13 August 1901 at Ruiterskraal, South Africa, towards the close of the action, Sergeant-Major Young, with a handful of men, rushed some kopjes which were being held by about 20 Boers. On reaching their objective, the enemy were seen galloping back to another kopje held by the Boers. Sergeant-Major Young then galloped on some 50 yards ahead of his party and closing with the enemy, shot one of them and captured the commandant, the latter firing three times at point-blank range before being taken prisoner.



Scottish flag
YOUNGER, David Reginald.[P]

Captain, Gordon Highlanders 1900.
Age:
29.
Deed:
On 11 July 1900 near Krugersdorp, South Africa, Captain Younger took out a party which successfully dragged an artillery waggon under cover of a small kopje, though exposed to very heavy and accurate enemy fire. He also accompanied a second party who went out to try to bring in the guns, but during the afternoon he was mortally wounded, dying shortly afterwards.
Notes:
Killed in this action.

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Further Reading

Blatherwick, Surgeon Commander F.J. 1000 Brave Canadians. The Unitrade Press, Toronto, Ontario, 1991 [ISBN: 0-919801-58-7]